AN ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZED CRIME AND EMERGING SECURITY CHALLENGES TO THE MODERN STATE: A CASE STUDY OF KENYA

Printer-friendly versionPDF version

Attention for organized crime and emerging security challenges has been rising in the past decade. The overall goal of this thesis was to analyze the organized crime and emerging security challenges to the modern state. Furthermore the cases of insecurity have been manifested in a variety of ways, which including; terrorist attacks targeting public  facilities,  civilians  and  security  personnel,  organized  crime  within  urban centres, radicalization and extremism in our places of worship as well as the growing trend of cybercrime in the country. The theoretic framework is based on differential Association Theory and securization theory. Both theories have specific attention for risks and threats. According to the theorist one cannot talk about securitization if the speech act fails, and controversial methods are not being legitimized by the audience. Study concludes that alliances of convenience between states and criminal organizations pose serious security threats, especially from those trafficking in weapons, in particular nuclear. As soon as a trafficking network is functioning effectively, product diversification is easy. Another point raised in the  analysis that the  control of organized crime is achieved only by understanding and learning how to reduce the domain of the illicit entrepreneur and a deeper analysis of the dynamics that nurture its illicit activities. Any control strategy that fails to recognize the importance of organized crime‘s economic links is dommed to fail. The study recommends that Sound institution building is a key ingredient in coping with the organized crime phenomenon. We should thus target building a cadre of corruption- resistant officials, legislators, judges, prosecutors, investigators, and regulators who can develop and enforce the type of complex laws necessary to prosecute large and sophisticated crime networks. These institution-building efforts should focus on developing all  elements  of an  effective criminal  justice system,  including police, prosecutors,  and  judges.  Further  study  recommends  that;  through  training  and technical assistance we should highlight methods to combat criminal enterprises, including alien smuggling, drug trafficking, money laundering, and financial crimes. We should conduct training, provide equipment, draft coherent criminal codes, create enforceable  codes  of ethics,  and  develop  professional  legal  and  law enforcement institutions

The Director's Message

PROF. AMB. MARIA NZOMO
Read message from the Director >>

Contacts

P. O. Box 30197 - 00100Nairobi, KENYA.
Tel: 318262 Ext. 28087/28380
Fax: 245566/251933
Email: director-idis@uonbi.ac.ke

Locate us

Community Outreach

Media Center

UoN Website | UoN Repository | ICTC Website


Copyright © 2017. ICT WebTeam, University of Nairobi