GENDER PERSPECTIVE OF FOOD SECURITY POLICY IN SOUTHERN AFRICA: A CASE STUDY OF MALAWI

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Food self-sufficiency advocated for in the 1970s and supported by many countries was replaced in the 1990s by the concept of food security, the objective of which is to make available all foodstuffs in sufficient quantities and with the adequate nutritional qualities, whatever is their origin, be they produced locally, imported, or donated as food aid.

 

 

 

Gender inequality both leads to and is a result of food insecurity. According to estimates women and girls make up 60% of the world's chronically hungry and little progress has been made in ensuring the equal right to food for women enshrined in the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

 

 

 

Women tend to be responsible for food preparation and childcare within the family and are more likely to be spent their income on food and their children’s needs. The gendered aspects of food security are visible along the four pillars of food security: availability, access, utilization and stability, as defined by the Food and Agriculture Organization.

 

 

 

This study seeks to analyse the gender perspectives of food security policies in southern Africa. Malawi will be used as a case study in the analysis. In the study, Liberal feminism theory shall be employed for analysis purposes.

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